Tag Archives: ice fishing

go fish!

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If you are visiting North Dakota over the New Years extended holiday there’s many outdoors options. Ice fishing is obvious. If you have kids coming home…maybe a new son-in-law from a far away state–whatever the reason. It’s pretty easy to get set. North Dakota  non-resident licenses are 3-10 and season long from $35  $25 and $10. Realize what’s $15 get at a movie theatre? about 5 gallons of gas…it’s just flat out reasonable. Buy the license 24/7/365 and your set to go www.gf.nd.gov

ice shack regulations

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Winter anglers are reminded that any fish house left unoccupied on North Dakota waters must be made out of materials that will allow it to float.

A popular question this time of the year is if campers qualify as legal fish houses. The answer is the same for any structure taken on the ice – if it’s left unattended, it must be able to float; if it’s not able to float, it must be removed when the angler leaves the ice.

Other fish house regulations include:

  • ·         Fish houses do not require a license.
  • ·         Occupied structures do not require identification. However, any unoccupied fish house must have the owner’s name, and either address or telephone number, displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high.
  • ·         Fish houses may not be placed closer than 50 feet in any direction to another house without consent of the occupant of the other fish house.
  • ·         Fish houses shall be removed from all waters by midnight, March 15, of each year. They can be used after March 15 if they are removed daily.

Anglers should refer to the 2012-14 North Dakota Fishing Guide for winter fishing regulations.

winter ice fishing regulations

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North Dakota anglers are encouraged to refer to the 2012-14 North Dakota Fishing Guide or the State Game and Fish Department’s website for winter fishing regulations.

In addition, anglers can visit the Game and Fish websitegf.nd.gov, for an extensive list of fishing questions and answers, and a winter fishing preview from North Dakota Outdoors magazine.

Some winter fishing regulations include:

  • ·         A maximum of four poles is legal for ice fishing. However, when fishing a water body where both open water and ice occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles, of which no more than two poles can be used in open water.
  • ·         Tip-ups are legal, and each tip-up is considered a single pole.
  • ·         There is no restriction on the size of the hole in the ice while fishing. When a hole larger than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice, the area in the immediate vicinity must be marked with a natural object. See regulations for more information.
  • ·         It is only legal to release fish back into the water immediately after they are caught. Once a fish is held in a bucket or on a stringer, they can no longer be legally released in any water.
  • ·         It is illegal to catch fish and transport them in water.
  • ·         It is illegal to leave fish, including bait, behind on the ice.
  • ·         Depositing or leaving any litter or other waste material on the ice or shore is illegal.
  • ·         Any dressed fish to be transported, if frozen, must be packaged individually. Anglers are not allowed to freeze fillets together in one large block. Two fillets count as one fish.
  • ·         The daily limit is a limit of fish taken from midnight to midnight, and no person may possess more than one day’s limit of fish while actively engaged in fishing. The possession limit is the maximum number of fish that an angler may have in his or her possession during a fishing trip of more than one day.

a little more caution…yes..on the ice

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Seems like everyday there’s a new concern in/on/around the ice. Today is no different.

Early ice fishing reports from many areas of the state have been promising.  However, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department advises winter anglers to be cautious when moving or removing permanent fish houses and travelling on state lakes.

Robert Timian, chief game warden, said an unseasonably mild winter has caused some ice houses to already break through the ice. “Record breaking high temperatures and strong winds this winter have resulted in inconsistent ice conditions in much of the state,” Timian said. “Anglers should assess the need to move their respective ice houses. If ice conditions on a lake deteriorate, they should check the weather forecast and consider removing their house.”

While snow and colder temperatures are yet to come, those conditions might come too late to help form solid ice for any length of time. “When we get into late February, warm weather and longer daylight will deteriorate ice conditions, causing shorelines that are already thin to weaken,” Timian said. “Therefore, we suggest anglers be aware of these unique winter conditions and be prepared to move, or even remove their ice houses.”

Whether the ice house is removed now or in two months, Timian advises anglers to do so before the ice begins to thaw. “Fish houses can become frozen into the ice under these conditions, causing some anglers to only take parts of the house that are easily retrievable,” he added. “This is unacceptable. The owner has a legal responsibility to remove the entire house and its contents.”

Permanent fish houses must be off the ice by midnight, March 15. Portable fish houses may be used after March 15 if they are removed daily

ice fishing regulations

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Winter Anglers Reminded of Regulations

North Dakota anglers are encouraged to refer to the 2010-12 North Dakota Fishing Guide or the State Game and Fish Department’s website for winter fishing regulations.

In addition, anglers can access the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, for an extensive list of winter fishing questions and answers.

Some winter fishing regulations include:

  • ·         A maximum of four poles is legal for ice fishing. However, when fishing a water body where both open water and ice occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles, of which no more than two poles can be used in open water.
  • ·         Tip-ups are legal, and each tip-up is considered a single pole.
  • ·         There is no restriction on the size of the hole in the ice while fishing. When a hole larger than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice, the area in the immediate vicinity must be marked with a natural object, such as a tree branch or tumbleweed, or a brightly painted or colored wooden lath. Markers must be visible from a minimum of 150 feet.
  • ·         It is only legal to release fish back into the water immediately after they are caught. Once a fish is held in a bucket or on a stringer, they can no longer be legally released in any water. In addition, it is illegal to catch fish and transport them to another water body.
  • ·         It is illegal to leave fish, including bait, behind on the ice.
  • ·         Depositing or leaving any litter or other waste material on the ice or shore is illegal.
  • ·         Any dressed fish to be transported, if frozen, must be packaged individually. Anglers are not allowed to freeze fillets together in one large block. Two fillets count as one fish.
  • ·         The daily limit is a limit of fish taken from midnight to midnight, and no person may possess more than one day’s limit of fish while actively engaged in fishing. The possession limit is the maximum number of fish that an angler may have in his or her possession during a fishing trip of more than one day

ice shack regulations

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Winter anglers are reminded that any fish house left unoccupied on North Dakota waters must be made out of materials that will allow it to float.

Robert Timian, enforcement chief for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said a popular question this time of the year is if campers qualify as legal fish houses.

“The answer is the same for any structure taken on the ice – if it’s left unattended, it must be able to float,” Timian said. “If it’s not able to float, it must be removed when the angler leaves the ice.”

Other fish house regulations include:

  • Fish houses are not required to be licensed.
  • Fish houses can be constructed of any size.
  • Occupied structures do not require identification. However, any unoccupied fish house must have the owner’s name, and either address or telephone number, displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high.
  • Fish houses may not be placed closer than 50 feet in any direction to another house without consent of the occupant of the other fish house.
  • Fish houses shall be removed from all waters by midnight, March 15, of each year. They can be used after March 15 if they are removed daily.

Anglers should refer to the 2010-12 North Dakota Fishing Guide for winter fishing regulations.