Tag Archives: hunting

deer lottery held

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Deer Lottery Held, Antlerless Licenses Remain

 

North Dakota’s deer gun lottery has been held and individual results are available online at the State Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov.

 

More than 2,300 antlerless deer gun licenses remain. Only resident applicants who were unsuccessful in the first lottery can apply for remaining licenses.

 

The first lottery application process – deer gun, muzzleloader, youth and landowner – had more than 94,000 applicants, and 46,000 were unsuccessful.

 

An option for unsuccessful applicants to apply online for remaining licenses will be available Aug. 6. Paper applications for remaining licenses will be mailed to individuals Aug. 11. The deadline for applying is Sept. 3.

 

 

 

Remaining Deer Gun Licenses

 

(B = Any Antlerless   D = Antlerless Whitetail)

 

Unit Type Available
3D1 D 34
3E1 D 175
3E2 B 64
3E2 D 361
3F1 B 120
3F1 D 320
3F2 B 380
3F2 D 687
4F D 176

2014 North Dakota swan season is set

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Swan Hunt Application Available Online

 

The online application for North Dakota’s 2014 tundra swan license lottery is available on the state Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. The deadline for applying is Aug. 13.

 

Paper applications will be available from Game and Fish offices, county auditors and license vendors. Hunters can also apply by calling 800-406-6409. A service fee is added for license applications made by phone.

 

North Dakota residents and nonresidents are eligible to apply.

 

Applicants may notice an increase in license fees, which were established and set by the 2013 state legislature. The resident swan license increased to $10, while nonresident swan increased to $30.

 

The statewide tundra swan hunting season is Oct. 4 – Jan. 4, 2015. A total of 2,200 licenses are available. Successful applicants will receive a tag to take one swan during the season. Since swans are classified as waterfowl, nonresidents may hunt them only during the period their nonresident waterfowl license is valid.

2014 North Dakota early Canada goose season

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North Dakota’s early Canada goose season is set, and bag limits and licensing requirements are the same as last year.

 

The season will open Aug. 15 and continue through Sept. 15, except in the Missouri River Zone where the season ends Sept. 7. The early Canada goose season has a limit of 15 daily and 45 in possession.

 

Limits and shooting hours for the early season are different from the regular season. Shooting hours during the early season are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset daily.

 

Residents need a $5 early Canada goose license and a general game and habitat license. Also, residents age 16 and older need a small game license. Nonresidents need only a $50 early Canada goose license, and the license is valid statewide without counting against the 14-day regular season license.

 

A federal duck stamp for hunters age 16 and older, and Harvest Information Program certification, is required beginning Sept. 1.

 

Hunters may notice an increase in license fees, which were established and set by the 2013 state legislature. The general game and habitat license increased to $20, the small game license is $10, and the combination license, which includes general game and habitat, small game, furbearer and fishing, increased to $50.

 

Hunters who purchase a license through the North Dakota Game and Fish Department website atgf.nd.gov, or instant licensing telephone number 800-406-6409, can easily get HIP certified. Otherwise, hunters can call 888-634-4798 and record the HIP number on their fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate. Those who registered to hunt the spring light goose season in North Dakota do not have to register with HIP again, as it is required only once per year.

 

Waterfowl rest areas, closed to hunting during the regular season, are open during the early season. Most land in these rest areas is private, so hunters may need permission to hunt.

 

The early hunting season is intended to reduce local Canada goose numbers. Despite liberalized regulations the past several years, with longer seasons, large bag limits and expanded shooting hours the statewide population remains high, with numbers well above population goals.

 

For additional information and regulations, hunters should refer to the Game and Fish Department website.

pronghorn application deadline

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Pronghorn applicants are reminded the deadline for submitting applications for the 2014 hunting season is Aug. 6. Only North Dakota residents are eligible to apply.

Hunters are encouraged to apply online at the State Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov. People who have accumulated preference points and choose not to apply this year will not lose their points.

A new state law requires residents age 18 or older to prove residency on the application by submitting a valid North Dakota driver’s license number or a North Dakota nondriver photo identification number. Applications will not be processed without this information.

The season is open only in unit 4-A, the far southwestern corner of the state. A total of 250 any-pronghorn licenses are available, and the season is split into an early “bow-only” portion, and a later gun/bow season.

2014 North Dakota pronghorn season

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North Dakota will have a limited pronghorn hunting season this fall for the first time since 2009.

 

Randy Kreil, wildlife chief for the State Game and Fish Department, said the season is open only in unit 4-A, the far southwestern corner of the state. A total of 250 any-pronghorn licenses are available, and the season is split into an early “bow-only” portion, and a later gun/bow season.

 

The bow-only portion of the season is from Aug. 29 (noon) – Sept. 28. Anyone who draws a license can hunt pronghorn with a bow, only in Unit 4-A, during this period.

 

From Oct. 3 (noon) – Oct.19, hunters who still have a valid license can use legal firearms or bow equipment.

 

“We are opening the hunting season in unit 4-A to take advantage of a surplus number of bucks in that area, and to provide hunting opportunity while still encouraging population growth,” Kreil said. “While we aren’t issuing any statewide pronghorn archery licenses this year as we did in the past, hunters who do draw a license can use a rifle, bow or both, depending on their preferences.”

 

Game and Fish biologists surveyed more than 11,000 square miles, 100 percent of the 21 survey units in the state, in early July. Statistics indicate a statewide population estimate of 5,700 pronghorn, with 1,650 in the area open to hunting.

 

“The number of pronghorn observed in Unit 4-A falls within our regional population objective of having a limited season, while all other units do not,” Kreil said.

 

In addition, unit 4-A has a high buck-to-doe ratio, Kreil said, which is typical of a population that has not been hunted. The fawn-to-doe ratio is also the highest since 2007.

 

“While some people may have expected more units to be open, we need to proceed conservatively with this valuable wildlife resource and let pronghorns rebound to a level that can sustain harvest. The good news is that we are poised to see additional units open next year, providing Mother Nature cooperates with a moderate winter,” Kreil said.

 

Only North Dakota residents are eligible to apply for a 2014 pronghorn license. Kreil said people who have accumulated preference points and choose not to apply this year will not lose their points.

 

In addition, state law allows youth who turn age 12 on or before December 31, 2014 to apply for a license.

 

Online applications for regular and gratis licenses will be available the week of July 21 at the Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will also be available from Game and Fish offices, county auditors and license vendors, or by calling 800-406-6409.

 

The pronghorn license fee is $30, and the deadline for submitting applications is Aug. 6.

report all poachers tips

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Two separate cases involving citations issued to out-of-state anglers for exceeding the possession limit on walleyes are perfect examples of public participation in helping enforce game and fish laws.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department chief of enforcement Robert Timian said one anonymous caller reported a case through the department’s enforcement office in Bismarck, while the other contacted a local district game warden.

“Both cases were very similar, and resulted from tips where anglers were catching and keeping more fish than the daily limit allows,” Timian said.

One investigation involved five adults cited for 100 walleyes over the possession limit. The other implicated eight individuals – six apprehended in North Dakota and two cited with cooperation from law enforcement officers in the state where the anglers reside – with an over-possession limit of 84 walleyes.

“Our hunters and anglers are passionate about protecting their resource,” Timian said. “These people took the appropriate actions by reporting the violations.”

Timian said violations can be reported through Report All Poachers, a local game warden or law enforcement agency, or a Game and Fish office.

RAP is a cooperative project between the Game and Fish Department, State Radio Communications and the North Dakota Wildlife Federation. The RAP line offers rewards – from $100 to $1,000 depending on the nature and seriousness of the crime – for information that leads to conviction of fish and wildlife law violators. Callers can remain anonymous.

Witnesses reporting a violation by calling RAP should call 800-472-2121. RAP will then contact the local game warden immediately. If the witness gives the RAP operator a phone number, the witness will be contacted right away.

spring pheasant crow counts

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North Dakota’s spring pheasant population index is up slightly from last year, according to the State Game and Fish Department’s 2014 spring crowing count survey.
 
Stan Kohn, upland game management supervisor, said the number of roosters heard crowing this spring was up about 6 percent statewide from 2013, with increases ranging from about 2 to 9 percent depending on the region.
 
While the spring number is a positive indicator, Kohn said it does not predict what North Dakota’s fall population will look like. Brood surveys, which begin in mid-July and are completed by September, provide a much better estimate of summer pheasant production and what hunters might expect for a fall pheasant population.
 
Last year, the fall population was down from 2012 because of rather poor production, but Kohn said low winter pheasant mortality, particularly in the southern one-third of the state, helped boost this year’s spring count.
 
Another positive is that abundant moisture has provided for good habitat conditions heading into the prime nesting period. However, Kohn noted that since 2008, North Dakota has lost more than 2 million acres of Conservation Reserve Program grasslands, much of it in the pheasant range. That means total nesting habitat in the state is significantly reduced from where it was when the spring crowing count index peaked in 2008.
 
The 2014 index is down about one-third from that peak. “Loss of CRP acres continue to reduce the amount of nesting and brood-rearing habitat on the landscape,” Kohn emphasized. “This and other grassland conversion is going to negatively affect our pheasant population in the future.”
 
Pheasant crowing counts are conducted each spring throughout North Dakota. Observers drive specified 20-mile routes, stopping at predetermined intervals, and counting the number of pheasant roosters heard crowing over a two-minute period during the stop.
 
The number of pheasant crows heard is compared to previous years’ data, providing a trend summary.

planning a summer trip?

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Visiting a NDGF WMA this summer?

If your 4th of July or summer excursions include a visit to one of North Dakota’s wildlife management area’s you should be aware of specific rules & regulations. This weeks North Dakota outdoors video visit with Jeb Williams has the rundown. Watch the video here or click this link

http://gf.nd.gov/publications/television/outdoors-online-webcast

more info on WMA’s is here

http://www.gf.nd.gov/hunting/wildlife-management-areas

deer application deadline

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North Dakota deer hunters are reminded the deadline for submitting applications for the 2014 gun season is June 4. Hunters are encouraged to apply online at the State Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov.

 

The deadline applies to muzzleloader, regular gun, gratis and nonresident landowner, and youth antlered mule deer applications (specifically for antlered mule deer in units 3B1, 3B2, and 4A-4F).

 

Gratis applications received on or before the regular deer gun lottery application deadline (June 4) will be issued an any-legal-deer license. As per state law, applications received after the deadline will be issued based on licenses remaining after the lottery – generally only antlerless licenses remain.

 

A new state law requires residents age 18 or older to prove residency on the application by submitting a valid North Dakota driver’s license number or a North Dakota nondriver photo identification number. Applications will not be processed without this information.

 

The deadline for regular statewide youth deer licenses is Sept. 1.

summer outdoors safety

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The single most important reminder the North Dakota Game and Fish Department will issue to recreationists this summer is to be alert and safe near water.
Boat and water safety coordinator Nancy Boldt said safety on the water begins with wearing a personal flotation device.
“Failure to wear a personal floatation device is the main reason people lose their lives in water recreation accidents,” Boldt said.
North Dakota law requires all children ages 10 and younger to wear a personal flotation device while in boats of less than 27 feet in length. The law also requires all personal watercraft users to wear a life jacket, as well as anyone towed on skis, tubes, boards or other similar devices.
Water users should make sure to wear life jackets that are the appropriate size, and in good condition. It is also important that children wear a PFD while swimming.
Water skiers and tubers should wear a life jacket with four nylon straps rather than one with a zipper, because straps are stronger than zippers upon impact with water. Anglers or persons paddling a canoe should opt for a PFD that is comfortable enough to wear for an entire outing.
Water skiers and tubers are reminded it takes three to ski and tube. When a person is towed on water skis or a similar device, an observer other than the operator is required on the vessel.
“In addition, it is important for swimmers to know water depth, as serious injuries can occur from diving into water,” Boldt said. “Large objects hidden below the water’s surface can lead to significant injury.”
North Dakota boaters also are reminded that marine VHF radios are an important part of boat safety that should not be improperly used by operators. These radios are intended for boat operators who are in distress and facing an emergency situation.
Regulations to help ensure safe boating this summer are found in the 2014-16 North Dakota Fishing Guide. A more comprehensive listing is available in the North Dakota Boat and Water Safety Guide or the Boat North Dakota education book. These guides are available online at the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, by email at ndgf@nd.gov, or at a local Game and Fish Department office.