Tag Archives: hunting

2014 coyote catalog

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , ,

The Coyote Catalog, a statewide effort connecting coyote hunters and trappers with landowners who want fewer coyotes in their areas, has been reopened by the North Dakota Department of Agriculture and the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

“I encourage landowners, especially farmers and ranchers who have problems with coyote depredation, to sign up for the Coyote Catalog,” said Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. “Hunting and trapping are valuable tools in managing these predators.”

This past season, 74 landowners signed up for the Coyote Catalog, a more than 50 percent increase over the previous year. Nearly 900 hunters and trappers also signed up.

NDDA officials estimate livestock producers in North Dakota lost more than $1 million last year to coyotes. At the same time, coyotes are a popular furbearer species for hunters and trappers.

“This can be a good way for hunters and trappers to locate new places to go,” said Game and Fish Director Terry Steinwand. “We’ve also had some positive feedback from landowners as well.”

Goehring and Steinwand said the U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services should be the first contact for landowners experiencing coyote depredation of livestock.

Landowners can sign up on the NDDA website at www.nd.gov/ndda/coyote-catalog. Required information includes county and contact information.

Hunters and trappers can sign up  at the NDGF website, gf.nd.gov.

Throughout the winter, hunters or trappers will receive information on participating landowners, and they can then contact landowners to make arrangements.

Anyone who registered for the Coyote Catalog in the past must register again to activate their names on the database.

The Coyote Catalog will remain active through March 31, 2015.

For more information, please contact Stephanie Tucker, NDGF, at 701-220-1871satucker@nd.gov; or Ted Quanrud, NDDA, at 701-328-2233 ortquanrud@nd.gov.

 

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

North Dakota waterfowl hunters are reminded the statewide duck and white-fronted goose seasons close Dec. 7. However, duck hunting in the high plains unitreopens Dec. 13 and continues through Jan. 4, 2015.

 

In addition, the season for Canada geese closes Dec. 25, except for the Missouri River Zone, which closes Jan. 2, 2015. Light goose hunting closes statewideJan. 4, 2015.

 

Archery deer, fall turkey, sharp-tailed and ruffed grouse, partridge, pheasant and tree squirrel hunting seasons continue through Jan. 4, 2015.

late season refuge hunting

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

Hunters are reminded that several North Dakota national wildlife refuges open to late-season upland game bird hunting the day after the deer gun season closes.

Arrowwood, Audubon, Des Lacs, J. Clark Salyer, Lake Alice, Lake Zahl, Long Lake, Lostwood, Tewaukon (pheasants only), and Upper Souris NWRs open Nov. 24.

However, portions of each refuge are closed to hunting. Hunters should contact refuge headquarters for map leaflets designating closed areas and other restrictions: Arrowwood 701-285-3341; Audubon 701-442-5474; Des Lacs 701-385-4046; J. Clark Salyer 701-768-2548; Lake Alice 701-662-8611; Lake Zahl 701-965-6488; Long Lake 701-387-4397; Lostwood 701-848-2722; Tewaukon 701-724-3598; and Upper Souris701-468-5467.

National wildlife refuges are managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Hunters are reminded that use of nontoxic shot is required on all USFWS lands. State regulations found in the North Dakota 2014-15 Small Game Guide apply. Seasons for pheasant, sharp-tailed grouse, Hungarian partridge and ruffed grouse close statewide on Jan. 4, 2015.

 

Advisory Board meetings set

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

Outdoor enthusiasts are invited to attend a North Dakota Game and Fish Department advisory board meeting in their area.

These public meetings, held each spring and fall, provide citizens with an opportunity to discuss fish and wildlife issues and ask questions of their district advisors and agency personnel.

The governor appoints eight Game and Fish Department advisors, each representing a multi-county section of the state, to serve as a liaison between the department and public.

Any person who requires an auxiliary aid or service must notify the contact person at least five days prior to the scheduled meeting date.

 

District 1 – Counties: Divide, McKenzie and Williams

Date: Nov. 24 – 7 p.m.

Location: Civic Center, Watford City

Host: McKenzie County Pheasants Forever

Contact: Rick Pokrzywinski, 770-2736

Advisory board member: Jason Leiseth, Arnegard, 586-3714

 

District 5 – Counties: Cass, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Steele and Traill

Date: Nov. 24 – 7 p.m.

Location: Community Center, Cogswell

Host: Southeast Sportsmen’s Club

Contact: Kevin Dockter, 680-8008

Advisory board member: Duane Hanson, West Fargo, 367-4249

 

District 4 – Counties: Grand Forks, Nelson, Pembina and Walsh

Date: Nov. 25 – 7 p.m.

Location: American Legion Club, Fordville

Host: Dakota Prairie Wildlife Club

Contact: Lynn Baier, 229-3665

Advisory board member: Ronald Houdek, Tolna, 262-4724

 

District 6 – Counties: Barnes, Dickey, Foster, Griggs, Logan, LaMoure, McIntosh, Stutsman and Wells

Date: Nov. 25 – 7 p.m.

Location: Gladstone Inn, Jamestown

Host: James Valley Pheasants Forever

Contact: Curt Francis, 799-0120

Advisory board member: Joel Christoferson, Litchville, 973-4981

 

District 2 – Counties: Bottineau, Burke, McHenry, Mountrail, Pierce, Renville and Ward

Date: Dec. 1 – 7 p.m.

Location: City Hall, Bowbells

Host: Stony Run Sportsmen Club

Contact: Tami Chrest, 339-2117

Advisory board member: Robert Gjellstad, Voltaire, 338-2281

 

District 3 – Counties: Benson, Cavalier, Eddy, Ramsey, Rolette and Towner

Date: Dec. 1 – 7 p.m.

Location: Research Center, Langdon

Host: Cavalier County Gun Club

Contact: Rodney Howatt, 370-9988

Advisory board member: Tom Rost, Devils Lake, 662-8620

 

District 7 – Counties: Burleigh, Emmons, Grant, Kidder, McLean, Mercer, Morton, Oliver, Sheridan and Sioux

Date: Dec. 2 – 7 p.m.

Location: Game and Fish Department, Bismarck

Host: Dakota Chapter Pheasants Forever

Contact: Rob Stenehjem, 400-8106

Advisory board member: Dave Nehring, Bismarck, 214-3184

 

District 8 – Counties: Adams, Billings, Bowman, Dunn, Golden Valley, Hettinger, Slope and Stark

Date: Dec. 2 – 7 p.m.

Location: American Legion, Killdeer

Host: North Dakota Fur Takers

Contact: Gary Jepson, 863-6535

Advisory board member: Dwight Hecker, Fairfield, 575-4952

 

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , ,

Have you seen?

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov. NDGF wildlife division chief Jeb Williams talks about the 2015 Deer Licensing Preferred Option, which would limit North Dakota deer hunters to only one license per year.  Click here to Watch! 

Game and Fish to recommend one deer license in 2015

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

A new plan under consideration by the State Game and Fish Department would allow North Dakota deer hunters only one license per year, starting with the 2015 season.

The preferred license distribution plan is the result of a declining deer population and continuing high license demand. “This year we had about 30,000 people who applied for a deer gun license and didn’t get one in the lottery,” said Game and Fish wildlife division chief Jeb Williams. “This new system will give more people an opportunity to hunt deer each year, compared to our current system.”

To gather input on possible changes, Game and Fish held a series of public deer management meetings across the state last winter. Hundreds of people attended these meetings, and many more interested hunters and landowners also provided written or verbal comments on how Game and Fish might manage deer license distribution, given the low population of both whitetail and mule deer in much of the state.

Following the deer management meetings, potential changes were also discussed at the spring round of public Game and Fish advisory board meetings held around the state.

“After evaluating all the input we received last winter,” Williams said, “the general feedback we heard is that hunters understand there is no longer enough licenses so that everyone can get one for the gun season, but at the same time, they don’t feel the current system is equitably distributing licenses, since some hunters can get two or even three licenses when thousands of hunters get none.”

To begin to address that inequity, Game and Fish’s preferred option for 2015 is to limit each hunter to one deer license per year. Williams said that still doesn’t guarantee that every gun hunter who applies in the lottery will get a deer license, but it will eliminate the possibility of someone getting multiple licenses.

If deer populations rebound substantially, Williams said the way licenses are allocated could return to the current system. “However, we are dealing with two dynamics that will make it difficult to do so anytime soon,” Williams added. “We have a deer herd that has been trending downward for several years, and we also have a growing population of people who possibly are interested in North Dakota’s hunting and fishing opportunities.”

In the preferred option, a hunter who is successful in the deer gun lottery would not be able to purchase a bow license or receive a muzzleloader license. However, as a way to provide additional bowhunting recreation, a hunter with a lottery gun license could also hunt with a bow any time during the open archery season, but only for the deer and unit specified on the license.

Resident hunters who apply in the deer gun lottery and do not receive a license, will still be able to purchase a bow license that is valid statewide for any deer.

“This is one of those things that we heard from people who like to hunt with both gun and bow,” Williams said. “They wanted to be able to apply for a gun license, and if they didn’t get one, they could still get a bow license. At the same time, if they did draw a gun license, they wanted a chance to hunt that deer with a bow during the archery season as well.

“We know it’s not the same as having both a gun and a bow license,” Williams added, “but we feel it’s a fair compromise while we work toward rebuilding our deer herd.”

Another part of the preferred option is that hunters would be able to apply simultaneously for the deer gun and muzzleloader lotteries. The application would allow choice of a preference, so if the hunter’s name is drawn and both muzzleloader and deer gun licenses are available at that time, the computer would issue the hunter’s preferred license.

In such cases, the computer would then remove the hunter’s name from the other lottery. Also in that case, Williams said a hunter would maintain the accumulated bonus points for the application that was removed from the lottery.

In addition, Williams said hunters will not lose any bonus points if they choose not to apply for a particular license.

Youth hunters under age 16 would be exempt under the preferred option, and could get a bow license as well as a deer gun or youth season license.

Gratis license holders could hunt in any open season on their own land, but may only get one license per year.

fall mule deer survey

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s fall mule deer survey indicated production in 2014 bodes well for the future.

 

Biologists counted 1,969 (1,761 in 2013) mule deer in the aerial survey in October. The buck-to-doe ratio of 0.50 (0.46 in 2013) was slightly above the long-term average of 0.43 bucks per doe, while the fawn-to-doe ratio of 0.95 (0.74 in 2013) was the highest since 1999, and above the long-term average of 0.90 fawns per doe.

 

“Overall, this year’s fawn production is very encouraging, and with average-to-good survival should result in another increase in the spring,” said Bruce Stillings, big game management supervisor, Dickinson.

 

While it is encouraging to see mule deer numbers increase for the short-term, Stillings said challenges remain for continued population growth, including changes in habitat quality due to fragmentation and disturbance, predators and weather.

 

The fall aerial survey, conducted specifically to study demographics, covers 24 study areas and 306.3 square miles in western North Dakota. Biologists survey the same study areas in the spring of each year to determine population abundance.

permit to posses dead deer

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

North Dakota Game and Fish Department enforcement personnel are issuing a reminder that a permit is required before taking possession, or any part, of a dead deer found near a road or in a field, including the skull with antlers. Only shed antlers can be possessed without a permit.

Permits to possess are free and available from game wardens and local law enforcement offices.

In addition, hunters are reminded to properly dispose of dead deer. Harvested deer cannot be left on the side of a roadway or in a ditch, and deer parts cannot be discarded in commercial dumpsters.

where is your deer tag?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , , , ,

The North Dakota Game and Fish Department urges deer hunters to find their license and check it for accuracy.

Every year the Game and Fish Department’s licensing section receives last-minute inquiries from hunters who can’t find their license. When that happens, it’s difficult to try to get a replacement license in time for the season opener.

Another reason to check the license now is to make sure the unit and species is what was intended.

Deer hunters in need of a replacement license can print out a duplicate (replacement) license application from the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, or can call 701-328-6300to have an application mailed or faxed.

The form must be completely filled out and notarized, and sent back in to the department with a fee.

_________________

deer tags sold out

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

The 48,000 deer gun licenses that were allocated by proclamation for the 2014 hunting season have all been issued, according to Randy Meissner, licensing manager for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

 

Meissner said according to state law, the number of deer gun licenses issued, including those licenses issued as gratis, cannot exceed the number of licenses authorized by the governor’s proclamation.

 

“This is the first time in more than a decade that all licenses were issued before opening day,” Meissner said.

 

The deer gun season opens Friday, Nov. 7 at noon central time.

 

Archery licenses can still be purchased through the end of the bow season on Jan. 4.

Skip to toolbar