Tag Archives: fishing

ice house regulations

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , ,

Winter anglers are reminded that any fish house left unoccupied on North Dakota waters must be made out of materials that will allow it to float.

A popular question this time of year is if campers qualify as legal fish houses. The answer is the same for any structure taken on the ice – if it’s left unattended, it must be able to float; if it’s not able to float, it must be removed when the angler leaves the ice.

Other fish house regulations include:

  • Fish houses do not require a license.
  • Occupied structures do not require identification. However, any unoccupied fish house must have the owner’s name, and either address or telephone number, displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high.
  • Fish houses may not be placed closer than 50 feet in any direction to another house without consent of the occupant of the other fish house.
  • Fish houses shall be removed from all waters by midnight, March 15, of each year. They can be used after March 15 if they are removed daily.

Anglers should refer to the 2014-16 North Dakota Fishing Guide for winter fishing regulations.

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , , ,

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov. Click here to Watch!   NDGF fisheries division chief Greg Power talks about this season’s Ice Fishing Prospects.   Click here to Watch!

winter fishing regulations

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

North Dakota anglers are encouraged to refer to the 2014-16 North Dakota Fishing Guide or the State Game and Fish Department’s website for winter fishing regulations.
In addition, anglers can visit the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, for an extensive list of fishing questions and answers.
Some winter fishing regulations include:
• A maximum of four poles is legal for ice fishing. However, when fishing a water body where both open water and ice occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles, of which no more than two poles can be used in open water.
• Tip-ups are legal, and each tip-up is considered a single pole.
• There is no restriction on the size of the hole in the ice while fishing. When a hole larger than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice, the area in the immediate vicinity must be marked with a natural object. See regulations for more information.
• It is only legal to release fish back into the water immediately after they are caught. Once a fish is held in a bucket or on a stringer, they can no longer be legally released in any water.
• It is illegal to catch fish and transport them in water.
• It is illegal to leave fish, including bait, behind on the ice.
• Depositing or leaving any litter or other waste material on the ice or shore is illegal.
• Any dressed fish to be transported, if frozen, must be packaged individually. Anglers are not allowed to freeze fillets together in one large block. Two fillets count as one fish.
• The daily limit is a limit of fish taken from midnight to midnight.  No person may possess more than one day’s limit of fish while on the ice or actively engaged in fishing. If a situation occurs when an angler engages in fishing overnight, the first daily limit must be removed from the ice by midnight prior to continuing to fish.
• The possession limit is the maximum number of fish that an angler may have in his or her possession during a fishing trip of more than one day.

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , ,

 

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online athttp://gf.nd.gov.

While the ice is now on the lakes, Game and Fish Department fisheries crews were busy this fall assessing lakes and reservoirs. NDGF fisheries management section leader Scott Gangl talks about the fall fish reproduction surveys. Click here to watch!  

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online athttp://gf.nd.gov.


While the ice is now on the lakes, Game and Fish Department fisheries crews were busy this fall assessing lakes and reservoirs. NDGF fisheries management section leader Scott Gangl talks about the fall fish reproduction surveys. Click here to watch!  

fall fisheries surveys

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries personnel have wrapped up surveys and sampling efforts for the open water season, and results point toward good conditions on the state’s big waters.

“Fishing in North Dakota continues to be record-setting on most all levels,” said Greg Power, fisheries chief. “A record number of fishing lakes has contributed considerably to the record number of fishing licenses sold in recent years.”

North Dakota’s three big fisheries – Lake Sakakawea, Lake Oahe/Missouri River and Devils Lake – continue to account for approximately half of the annual statewide fishing effort.

Good habitat and forage conditions in Lake Sakakawea have resulted in an abundance of rainbow smelt and other alternative forage, which in turn has contributed to excellent condition and growth of game fish. Walleye numbers are high, and recruitment of several strong year classes in recent years bodes well for the future. In addition, a good population of northern pike should produce some of trophy quality.

Overall health of the Devils Lake fishery remains good. Walleye abundance is strong and anglers fishing for walleye this winter should expect similar numbers and size fish as compared to recent years. Northern pike are still plentiful with a nice average weight of about four pounds. The number of catchable-sized perch available is down from 2013 but still should be considered good.  Anglers will notice fewer of the large 12-14 inch perch this winter.

The Missouri River between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe is still under the influence of habitat changes caused by the flood in 2011. Walleye numbers remain low, and walleye reproduction and forage fish production have been poor in recent years. However, the outlook has greatly improved in Lake Oahe, especially near the South Dakota border where recovering forage populations have led to improvements in walleye condition and growth. In addition, northern pike are in good shape, with many of trophy size.

 

Twins Lakes boat ramp

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , ,

The Twin Lakes boat ramp located 4 miles north of LaMoure is now open for public use after it was closed for several weeks due to reconstruction.

fall fisheries surveys

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

North Dakota Game and Fish Department fisheries biologists are assessing how the cooler-than-normal summer may have impacted fish spawning and stocking success across the state.

Fisheries management section leader Scott Gangl said it looks like catches varied this year, depending on the lake or fish species. “On a lot of our smaller lakes, we had extremely high catch rates of young-of-the-year fish in some, but disappointing catches in others,” Gangl said. “Overall, though, I’d say we experienced average reproduction and stocking success.”

With good water levels and abundant spawning habitat, Gangl said Lake Sakakawea produced good catches of virtually all young-of-year fish. Walleye were most abundant in the upper and middle sections of the reservoir, he said, with good numbers of perch and pike throughout. “Forage fish are plentiful on Lake Sakakawea this year, and both sonar surveys and anecdotal observations suggest rainbow smelt production was really good in 2014,” Gangl added.

Devils Lake and Stump Lake reported fair to good numbers of young-of-the-year walleye, while yellow perch reproduction was much lower than the strong reproduction year of 2013. “Although walleye natural reproduction was down in 2014, good reproduction in recent years has resulted in an abundance of young walleye in Devils Lake,” Gangl said. “Strong numbers of yearling perch will provide a good source of forage for walleye and other predators.”

According to Gangl, Lake Oahe is starting to show signs of recovery from the flood of 2011. “Although smelt numbers are still very low, reproduction of other forage fish, mostly white bass and crappie, was very good in 2014,” he added. “Young-of-year walleye displayed their highest catch rate since the dominant year class in 2009.”

However, Gangl said the Missouri River isn’t showing such signs of recovery, as catch rates of forage fish and young-of-year game fish remain low upstream from Lake Oahe. Biologists attribute poor production on the river to the massive habitat changes during the 2011 flood. “The flood scoured and changed the river channel so dramatically, it’s going to take a much longer time to recover,” Gangl said. “The productive capacity was taken away. It’s like scraping the topsoil from a field.”

record fishing license sales in North Dakota

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , , , ,

The number of anglers buying fishing licenses in North Dakota continues to increase, as 2013-14 is the second consecutive year a new record for license sales has been established.

 

Statistics compiled by the Game and Fish Department revealed more than 219,000 fishing licenses were sold last year, an increase of 1,000 from 2012-13. A record total of 160,100 resident and 59,300 nonresident fishing licenses were sold last year.

 

In terms of actual individuals participating in fishing, the past year was again record-setting with more than 203,000 active anglers. Ice fishing activity experienced a substantial increase, while open water angler days took a slight dip.

 

A record number of fishing lakes (many at all-time elevations) and aggressive fish management in North Dakota have helped produce record fishing license sales.

 

Lake Sakakawea, Devils Lake and Lake Oahe/Missouri River remained the top three fisheries in the state.

9 year old breaks goldeye record

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , , , , ,

Youth angler Brayden Selzler’s catch on July 25 shattered a state record for goldeye that’s been in the books for 16 years.

 

The 9-year-old Velva angler reeled in a 4-pound, 12-ounce goldeye from Lake Audubon.

 

The previous record of 3 pounds, 13 ounces was established in 1998 by Craig Unser, a Mandan angler who was fishing New John’s Lake.

Skip to toolbar