Tag Archives: elk

big three lottery has been held

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North Dakota’s moose, elk and bighorn sheep lottery results are available online at the State Game and Fish Department’s website,gf.nd.gov.

 

Applicants can find individual results by clicking “find lottery results/preference points” under the online services link.

 

Successful applicants will receive a letter the week of May 19, stating the license will be mailed after the successful applicant submits the correct license fee.

 

time is running out

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The 2014 big three applications close at midnight Dec 26! North Dakota’s 2014 bighorn sheep, elk and moose proclamation is finalized and most season information is the same as last year.

The bighorn sheep season will have five licenses available, one more than last year. Licenses in Unit B1 increased from one to two due to skewed male-female ratios caused by declining numbers of females. Unit B2, which was created to prevent overharvest of Sully Creek rams, has been immersed into B1 due to low numbers in the area. Similar to last year, collared rams may not be harvested in Unit B3. The season length has been extended to two months, and the new opening date corresponds with the peak of the rut to improve prospects of finding mature rams.

A total of 261 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, the same as in 2013. A total of 937 elk – including 701 adult cows – were taken out of the South Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park during the National Park Service’s reduction effort from 2010-2012. In addition, an estimated 363 elk were taken by licensed hunters in E3 and E4, reducing the number of elk in the park to below 200. Therefore, the number of elk licenses in units E3 and E4 will remain the same as last year.

A total of 111 moose licenses are available in 2014, the same as last year. Hunting units M1C and M4 will remain closed due to a continued downward trend in moose numbers in the northeastern part of the state.

Online applications are available by visiting the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be available on the website for printing, and at license vendors the week of March 10. The deadline for applying is March 26.

The application fee for moose, elk and bighorn sheep has increased from $3 to $5 for each species, as part of the license fee increase bill passed by the 2013 state legislature. For those who are fortunate enough to draw a license, the fee has increased from $20 to $30.

Bighorn sheep, moose and elk lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

2013 North Dakota big three success rates

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2013 Bighorn Sheep, Moose and Elk Harvests

Harvest statistics released by the North Dakota Game and Fish Department show overall hunter success during the 2013 season for bighorn sheep was 100 percent, 91 percent for moose and 50 percent for elk.

The department issued three bighorn sheep licenses and auctioned one. All four hunters harvested a bighorn ram.

The department issued 111 moose licenses last year. Of that total, 111 hunters harvested 101 animals – 85 bulls and 16 cows/calves. One additional license was raffled by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the hunter was successful in harvesting a moose. Harvest for each unit follows:

Unit

Hunters

Bulls

Cow/Calf

Success Rate

M5

5

1

4

100

M6

15

4

6

67

M8

15

14

1

100

M9

25

22

2

96

M10

51

44

3

92

 

The department issued 271 elk licenses last year. Of that total, 255 hunters harvested 127 elk – 77 bulls and 50 cows/calves. One additional license was raffled by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the hunter was successful in harvesting an elk. Harvest for each unit follows:

Unit

Hunters

Bulls

Cow/Calf

Success Rate

E1

68

11

19

44

E2

116

29

27

48

E3

47

25

3

60

E4

24

12

1

54

 

keep an eye out for deer this time of year

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Last week was quite active with moose, elk and even a mountain lion involved in vehicle-critter accidents. Let’s keep vigilant:

 

Motorists are reminded to watch for deer along roadways, especially this time of year, because juvenile animals are dispersing from their home ranges.

 

October through early December is the peak period for deer-vehicle accidents. Motorists are advised to slow down and exercise caution after dark to reduce the likelihood of encounters with deer along roadways. Most deer-vehicle accidents occur primarily at dawn and dusk when deer are most often moving around.

 

Motorists should be aware of warning signs signaling deer are in the area. When you see one deer cross the road, look for a second or third deer to follow. Also, pay attention on roadways posted with Deer Crossing Area caution signs.

 

Deer-vehicle accidents are at times unavoidable. If an accident does happen, a new law passed by the 2013 state legislature eliminates the need for the driver involved in an accident to notify law enforcement authorities, if only the vehicle is damaged. Deer-vehicle accidents that involve injury or other property damage still must be reported.

 

In addition, a permit is still required to take parts or the whole carcass of a road-killed deer. Permits are free and available from game wardens and local law enforcement offices.

 

A few precautions can minimize chances of injury or property damage in a deer-vehicle crash.

 

  • Always wear your seat belt.
  • Don’t swerve or take the ditch to avoid hitting a deer. Try to brake as much as possible and stay on the roadway. Don’t lose control of your vehicle or slam into something else to miss the deer. You risk less injury by hitting the deer.
  • If you spot deer ahead, slow down immediately and honk your horn.

deadline is hours away for moose-elk-bighorn sheep

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North Dakota’s 2013 moose, elk and bighorn sheep proclamation is finalized and applications are available at the State Game and Fish Department’s website. The deadline for applying is March 27.

A total of 111 moose licenses are available in 2013, 32 fewer than last year.

Randy Kreil, Game and Fish Department wildlife chief, said a downward population trend in the northeastern portion of the state is of great concern. “Unit M1C will remain closed,” Kreil said, “and in addition, unit M4, which encompasses the Turtle Mountains, is also closed this year.”

In 2012, unit M4 had only seven moose licenses, Kreil added, with only two moose harvested.

Game and Fish is also making a couple of other changes designed to bolster the moose population. All licenses this year are for “any moose,” while in previous years some were specific to antlerless moose. “We think that the ‘any’ tags will protect the cow segment of the population,” Kreil said, “as records indicate most hunters choose to fill their ‘any’ tags with a bull rather than a cow.”

The moose season in units M8, M9 and M10 will open a week later than in previous years to avoid the peak of the rut. Data collected over the last year indicates a number of unbred cows were documented in those units, Kreil said, and opening the season a week later in October may improve breeding success by reducing disturbance during the peak of the mating season.

A total of 261 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, 40 fewer than last year.

The number of elk licenses in units E3 and E4 is reduced by 40 due to the successful population reduction effort by the National Park Service in Theodore Roosevelt National Park’s south unit. A total of 937 elk – 701 adult cows – were taken out of the park by the reduction effort, and an additional 363 elk were taken by licensed hunters in E3 and E4 during the last three hunting seasons. Based on a recent elk survey, the estimated number of elk in the park is below 200, Kreil said.

On the positive side, elk unit E1 has been expanded to include parts of the Turtle Mountains, due to a growing elk population largely attributed to animals migrating in from Canada.

The bighorn sheep season will have four licenses available, the same as last year. One license is available in units B1/B2, B3 and B4. In addition, one license is auctioned through the Midwest Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation. The bighorn sheep hunter drawing the license in units B1/B2 is eligible to hunt both units.

To apply online, access the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be available on the website (for printing) and at license vendors the week of March 11.

Bighorn sheep, moose and elk lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

the BIG three seasons are set!

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Moose, Elk and Bighorn Sheep Seasons Set

North Dakota’s 2013 moose, elk and bighorn sheep proclamation is finalized and applications are available at the State Game and Fish Department’s website. The deadline for applying is March 27.

A total of 111 moose licenses are available in 2013, 32 fewer than last year.

Randy Kreil, Game and Fish Department wildlife chief, said a downward population trend in the northeastern portion of the state is of great concern. “Unit M1C will remain closed,” Kreil said, “and in addition, unit M4, which encompasses the Turtle Mountains, is also closed this year.”

In 2012, unit M4 had only seven moose licenses, Kreil added, with only two moose harvested.

Game and Fish is also making a couple of other changes designed to bolster the moose population. All licenses this year are for “any moose,” while in previous years some were specific to antlerless moose. “We think that the ‘any’ tags will protect the cow segment of the population,” Kreil said, “as records indicate most hunters choose to fill their ‘any’ tags with a bull rather than a cow.”

The moose season in units M8, M9 and M10 will open a week later than in previous years to avoid the peak of the rut. Data collected over the last year indicates a number of unbred cows were documented in those units, Kreil said, and opening the season a week later in October may improve breeding success by reducing disturbance during the peak of the mating season.

A total of 261 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, 40 fewer than last year.

The number of elk licenses in units E3 and E4 is reduced by 40 due to the successful population reduction effort by the National Park Service in Theodore Roosevelt National Park’s south unit. A total of 937 elk – 701 adult cows – were taken out of the park by the reduction effort, and an additional 363 elk were taken by licensed hunters in E3 and E4 during the last three hunting seasons. Based on a recent elk survey, the estimated number of elk in the park is below 200, Kreil said.

On the positive side, elk unit E1 has been expanded to include parts of the Turtle Mountains, due to a growing elk population largely attributed to animals migrating in from Canada.

The bighorn sheep season will have four licenses available, the same as last year. One license is available in units B1/B2, B3 and B4. In addition, one license is auctioned through the Midwest Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation. The bighorn sheep hunter drawing the license in units B1/B2 is eligible to hunt both units.

To apply online, access the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be available on the website (for printing) and at license vendors the week of March 11.

Bighorn sheep, moose and elk lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

2012 moose, elk, bighorn sheep harvest success

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2012 Bighorn Sheep, Moose and Elk Harvests

Harvest statistics released by the North Dakota Game and Fish Department show overall hunter success during the 2012 season for bighorn sheep was 100 percent, 93 percent for moose and 62 percent for elk.

The department issued three bighorn sheep lottery licenses and one auction license. All four hunters harvested a bighorn ram.

The department issued 143 moose licenses last year. Of that total, 139 hunters harvested 129 animals – 80 bulls and 49 cows/calves. Harvest for each unit follows:

Unit

Hunters

Bulls

Cow/Calf

Success Rate

M4

6

0

2

33

M5

5

4

1

100

M6

14

5

8

93

M8

15

15

0

100

M9

30

15

13

93

M10

69

41

25

96

 

The department issued 315 elk licenses last year. Of that total, 302 hunters harvested 188 elk – 101 bulls and 85 cows/calves. One additional license was auctioned by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the hunter was unsuccessful in harvesting an elk. Harvest for each unit follows:

Unit

Hunters

Bulls

Cow/Calf

Success Rate

E1

67

14

31

69

E2

123

34

44

63

E3

73

37

3

56

E4

38

16

7

61

 

deadline looms for North Dakota moose, elk and bighorn sheep applications

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Don’t wait until tomorrow. That’s to late as North Dakota’s 2011 moose, elk and bighorn sheep peadline for applying is March 30.
A total of 501 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, a decrease of 60 from last year.
The number of elk licenses in units E3 and E4 has been reduced by 100 due to the successful population reduction effort by the National Park Service in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Randy Kreil, North Dakota Game and Fish Department chief of wildlife, said 300 any-elk licenses will be available in units E3 and E4, and there will be no antlerless licenses issued in these two units in an effort to give hunters the maximum opportunity to harvest an elk.
“A total of 406 cow elk were taken out of the park by the reduction effort, and an estimated 76 cow elk were taken last fall by licensed hunters in E3 and E4,” Kreil said. “This harvest effectively reduced the cow elk population in and around the park by at least one third.”
Kreil said the successful elk reduction effort in TRNP this past year, and the possibility of similar results the next two years, will reduce elk numbers dramatically in units E3 and E4. Therefore, elk licenses will likely be reduced even further in future years.
Certain private lands in units E1 and E2 could open to hunting of antlerless elk from Aug. 12 – Sept. 30 if depredation problems occur and other measures are proven ineffective.
A total of 163 moose licenses are available in 2011, a decrease of 10 from last year.
The boundary for moose hunting unit M11 has been expanded to allow hunting over a wider area in western North Dakota where moose numbers have increased south of Williston along the Missouri River corridor.
“This area will be monitored closely in the coming years to see if populations decrease now that Lake Sakakawea is full and much of the habitat that allowed the moose population to grow is under water,” Kreil said.
Unit M1C will remain closed due to an extremely low moose population in the northeastern portion of the state.
The bighorn sheep season will be similar to last year with six licenses available – one license in units B1/B2, two in units B3 and B4, and one license auctioned through the Midwest Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation. The bighorn sheep hunter drawing the license in units B1/B2 is eligible to hunt both units.
To apply online, access the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be available on the website (for printing) and at license vendors the week of March 14.
Bighorn sheep, moose and elk lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

Don’t wait until tomorrow. That’s to late as North Dakota’s 2011 moose, elk and bighorn sheep peadline for applying is March 30.A total of 501 elk licenses are available to hunters this fall, a decrease of 60 from last year.The number of elk licenses in units E3 and E4 has been reduced by 100 due to the successful population reduction effort by the National Park Service in Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Randy Kreil, North Dakota Game and Fish Department chief of wildlife, said 300 any-elk licenses will be available in units E3 and E4, and there will be no antlerless licenses issued in these two units in an effort to give hunters the maximum opportunity to harvest an elk.“A total of 406 cow elk were taken out of the park by the reduction effort, and an estimated 76 cow elk were taken last fall by licensed hunters in E3 and E4,” Kreil said. “This harvest effectively reduced the cow elk population in and around the park by at least one third.”Kreil said the successful elk reduction effort in TRNP this past year, and the possibility of similar results the next two years, will reduce elk numbers dramatically in units E3 and E4. Therefore, elk licenses will likely be reduced even further in future years.Certain private lands in units E1 and E2 could open to hunting of antlerless elk from Aug. 12 – Sept. 30 if depredation problems occur and other measures are proven ineffective.A total of 163 moose licenses are available in 2011, a decrease of 10 from last year.The boundary for moose hunting unit M11 has been expanded to allow hunting over a wider area in western North Dakota where moose numbers have increased south of Williston along the Missouri River corridor.“This area will be monitored closely in the coming years to see if populations decrease now that Lake Sakakawea is full and much of the habitat that allowed the moose population to grow is under water,” Kreil said.Unit M1C will remain closed due to an extremely low moose population in the northeastern portion of the state.The bighorn sheep season will be similar to last year with six licenses available – one license in units B1/B2, two in units B3 and B4, and one license auctioned through the Midwest Chapter of the Wild Sheep Foundation. The bighorn sheep hunter drawing the license in units B1/B2 is eligible to hunt both units.To apply online, access the Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Paper applications will be available on the website (for printing) and at license vendors the week of March 14.Bighorn sheep, moose and elk lottery licenses are issued as once-in-a-lifetime licenses in North Dakota. Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

TRNP elk

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Today marks the National Park Service deadline to apply if your interested in being considered as a volunteer for the elk reduction efforts:

North Dakota state officials are encouraged that the National Park Service has started recruiting volunteers to help reduce the elk population in Theodore Roosevelt National Park’s south unit.

The NPS announced details of the process July 19. Under the plan, volunteers will have an opportunity to harvest elk within the park using firearms. The plan includes having five teams, each consisting of one team leader and four volunteers, in the park each week for 12 weeks, beginning in November 2010. Therefore, a maximum of 240 volunteers may be needed.

“This is very close to the alternative we recommended to the NPS, and North Dakota citizens asked for,” said Terry Steinwand, North Dakota Game and Fish Department Director. “We offer our support to the Park Service as this alternative is put into place, and we encourage North Dakotans to take the lead and submit an application.”

The NPS is the agency responsible for managing TRNP and is developing and implementing actions intended to reduce elk numbers in the park. The Game and Fish Department role as a cooperating agency is to provide technical advice and assistance to the NPS as it implements the process, and to facilitate the transfer of elk meat to the volunteers.

“We have worked to give North Dakotans an opportunity to help reduce the park’s elk population and keep part of the meat,” said Gov. John Hoeven. “Now we look forward to helping the Park Service succeed with this plan.”

In coordination with the park elk removal plan, Game and Fish has its elk seasons in units E3 and E4 outside the park open during November and December. In addition, the Department also plans to recommend an amendment to the proclamation that would allow licensed E3 and E4 elk hunters who were not successful during the regular season, to take cow elk outside the park in January.

Individuals who received a North Dakota elk license in the past are eligible to apply. In addition, participating in this elk reduction management plan does not eliminate someone from future consideration for a North Dakota elk license.

For more information on the application process, access the TRNPS website at Requires PDF Viewer www.nps.gov/thro/upload/Application_Instructions.pdf. A question and answer summary of the elk reduction plan is available atRequires PDF Viewer www.nps.gov/thro/upload/Elk-Reduction-FAQ.pdf.

 

 

 

weekend Outdoors Live

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Saturday at 3PM is this weekend Outdoors Live. Valerie Naylor from the National Park Service on the elk reduction program. Clay Whittlesey from Fargo Park District previews the Midwest Waterfowl Fest and we talk zebra mussels and the Red River with Lynn Schlueter Don’t forget our weekly Central Dakota Outdoors report with Pat Stockdill

Listen live on AM 790 http://www.kfgo.com
podcast at http://www.outdoorslive.podcastpeople.com
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