have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

Have you seen?

The November  issue of North Dakota Outdoors magazine has been outfor a couple of weeks and has a comprehensive story on a proposal for deer licensing in 2015. Game and Fish wildlife chief Jeb Williams explains the proposal in depth. It’s an excellent read and you’ll learn more about the history of North Dakota’s deer management and the discussions on the future. Plus a look at North Dakota ice fishing through the years. Check these stories and more in the full November issue available right here: or here

http://gf.nd.gov/publications

_________________

winter spearfishing class

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

BOW Program Offers Darkhouse Spearfishing Class
The North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s Becoming an Outdoors-Woman program has scheduled a one-day darkhouse spearfishing class Jan. 10 at the Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge northwest of Minot.
Women interested in attending the class must register online at the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov. The cost is $50, and preregistration with payment is required. Equipment and snacks will be provided. In addition, each participant must register to darkhouse spearfish.
More information is available by contacting Nancy Boldt, program coordinator at 701-328-6312, or email ndgf@nd.gov.

winter fishing regulations

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

North Dakota anglers are encouraged to refer to the 2014-16 North Dakota Fishing Guide or the State Game and Fish Department’s website for winter fishing regulations.
In addition, anglers can visit the Game and Fish website, gf.nd.gov, for an extensive list of fishing questions and answers.
Some winter fishing regulations include:
• A maximum of four poles is legal for ice fishing. However, when fishing a water body where both open water and ice occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles, of which no more than two poles can be used in open water.
• Tip-ups are legal, and each tip-up is considered a single pole.
• There is no restriction on the size of the hole in the ice while fishing. When a hole larger than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice, the area in the immediate vicinity must be marked with a natural object. See regulations for more information.
• It is only legal to release fish back into the water immediately after they are caught. Once a fish is held in a bucket or on a stringer, they can no longer be legally released in any water.
• It is illegal to catch fish and transport them in water.
• It is illegal to leave fish, including bait, behind on the ice.
• Depositing or leaving any litter or other waste material on the ice or shore is illegal.
• Any dressed fish to be transported, if frozen, must be packaged individually. Anglers are not allowed to freeze fillets together in one large block. Two fillets count as one fish.
• The daily limit is a limit of fish taken from midnight to midnight.  No person may possess more than one day’s limit of fish while on the ice or actively engaged in fishing. If a situation occurs when an angler engages in fishing overnight, the first daily limit must be removed from the ice by midnight prior to continuing to fish.
• The possession limit is the maximum number of fish that an angler may have in his or her possession during a fishing trip of more than one day.

Dec 1 spearfishing opens

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

North Dakota’s darkhouse spearfishing season opens on most state waters December 1. The season extends through March 15. Legal fish are northern pike and nongame species.

Darkhouse spearing is allowed for all residents with a valid fishing license and for residents under age 16. Nonresidents may darkhouse spearfish in North Dakota if they are from states that offer the same privilege for North Dakota residents.

All individuals who participate in darkhouse spearfishing must register with the North Dakota Game and Fish Department prior to participating. Registration is available at the department’s website,gf.nd.gov, or through any Game and Fish Department office.

All waters open to hook and line fishing are open to darkhouse spearing except:

Braun Lake – Logan County

East Park Lake, West Park Lake, Lake Audubon – McLean County

Heckers Lake – Sheridan County

McClusky Canal

New Johns Lake – Burleigh County

Red Willow Lake – Griggs County

Sweet Briar Dam – Morton County

Anglers should refer to the 2014-16 North Dakota Fishing Guide for more information.

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , ,

 

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online athttp://gf.nd.gov.

While the ice is now on the lakes, Game and Fish Department fisheries crews were busy this fall assessing lakes and reservoirs. NDGF fisheries management section leader Scott Gangl talks about the fall fish reproduction surveys. Click here to watch!  

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online athttp://gf.nd.gov.


While the ice is now on the lakes, Game and Fish Department fisheries crews were busy this fall assessing lakes and reservoirs. NDGF fisheries management section leader Scott Gangl talks about the fall fish reproduction surveys. Click here to watch!  

have you seen?

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

Ice has been forming for several days now across North Dakota and anglers are eager to get out for this winter time hobby. But there’s plenty of safety considerations to take into account.

NDGF water safety coordinator Nancy Boldt talks about Safety on the Ice.   Click here to Watch!  . This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov.

early season ice safety

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , , ,

Winter anglers and late-season hunters are reminded to consider ice conditions before traveling onto and across North Dakota lakes, as most small and mid-sized waters currently give the appearance of safe foot travel.

State Game and Fish Department boat and water safety coordinator Nancy Boldt said ice thickness is never consistent, especially this time of the year, and can vary significantly within a few inches. “The edges become firm before the center,” Boldt said. “So, with your first step the ice might seem like it is strong enough, but it may not be anywhere near solid enough once you progress away from the shoreline.”

This was apparent last weekend as one hunter experienced this while trying to retrieve a duck that had landed on ice. “He went through up to his neck and his waders filled with water, and the freezing temperature instantly took his breath away,” Boldt said. “He was extremely fortunate to be able to pull himself out, as most people would not have been able to with the extra water weight.”

Boldt said some tips include:

  • Avoid cracks, pressure ridges, slushy or darker areas that signal thinner ice. The same goes for ice that forms around partially submerged trees, brush, embankments or other structures.
  • Ice thickness is not consistent and can vary significantly even in a small area. Ice shouldn’t be judged by appearance alone. Anglers should drill test holes as they make their way out on the lake, and an ice chisel should be used to check ice thickness while moving around.
  • Daily temperature changes cause ice to expand and contract, affecting its strength.
  • The following minimums are recommended for travel on clear-blue lake ice formed under ideal conditions. However, early in the winter it’s a good idea to double these figures to be safe: 4 inches for a group walking single file; 6 inches for a snowmobile or all-terrain vehicle; 8-12 inches for an automobile; and 12-15 inches for a pickup/truck.

These tips could help save a life:

  • Wear a personal flotation device and carry a cell phone.
  • Carry ice picks or a set of screwdrivers to pull yourself back on the ice if you fall through.
  • If someone breaks through the ice, call 911 immediately. Rescue attempts should employ a long pole, board, rope, blanket or snowmobile suit. If that’s not possible, throw the victim a life jacket, empty water jug or other buoyant object. Go to the victim as a last resort, but do this by forming a human chain where rescuers lie on the ice with each person holding the feet of the person in front.
  • To treat hypothermia, replace wet clothing with dry clothing and immediately transport victim to a hospital.

late season refuge hunting

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

Hunters are reminded that several North Dakota national wildlife refuges open to late-season upland game bird hunting the day after the deer gun season closes.

Arrowwood, Audubon, Des Lacs, J. Clark Salyer, Lake Alice, Lake Zahl, Long Lake, Lostwood, Tewaukon (pheasants only), and Upper Souris NWRs open Nov. 24.

However, portions of each refuge are closed to hunting. Hunters should contact refuge headquarters for map leaflets designating closed areas and other restrictions: Arrowwood 701-285-3341; Audubon 701-442-5474; Des Lacs 701-385-4046; J. Clark Salyer 701-768-2548; Lake Alice 701-662-8611; Lake Zahl 701-965-6488; Long Lake 701-387-4397; Lostwood 701-848-2722; Tewaukon 701-724-3598; and Upper Souris701-468-5467.

National wildlife refuges are managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Hunters are reminded that use of nontoxic shot is required on all USFWS lands. State regulations found in the North Dakota 2014-15 Small Game Guide apply. Seasons for pheasant, sharp-tailed grouse, Hungarian partridge and ruffed grouse close statewide on Jan. 4, 2015.

 

fishing tournament notice

0
Filed under Uncategorized
Tagged as , , , ,

Organizers planning fishing tournaments, including ice fishing contests this winter, are reminded to submit an application along with fishing tournament regulations to the North Dakota Game and Fish Department at least 30 days prior to the start of the event.

The 30-day advance notice allows for review by agency staff to ensure the proposed tournament will not have negative consequences or conflicts with other proposed tournaments for the same location and/or time.

Tournaments may not occur without first obtaining a valid permit from the department.

In addition, the number of open-water tournaments on lakes Sakakawea and Oahe, the Missouri River and Devils Lake are capped each year, depending on the time of the year and location. Sponsors for tournaments on these water bodies must submit their application to the department prior to Jan. 1 to ensure full consideration.