Author Archives: dougleier

this is not an official ND Game & Fish blog. This is from Doug Leier not the NDGF

have you seen?

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This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov. North Dakota Game and Fish fisheries development supervisor Bob Frohlich talks about boat ramp access. Click here to Watch! and click here to see full details on North Dakota boating access and information http://gf.nd.gov/boating

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Doug Leier

moose & elk deadline

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Applications for this fall’s moose and elk hunting seasons must be in the mail and postmarked before midnight March 25.

To apply online, or to print out an application to mail, access the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Applications are also available at Game and Fish offices, county auditors and license vendors.

Residents age 18 or older are reminded to prove residency on the application by submitting a valid North Dakota driver’s license number or a North Dakota nondriver photo identification number.

Individuals mailing applications to the department are advised to mail early because some post offices use the following day’s postmark for mail received after regular hours. The department’s online application feature will be deactivated March 25 at midnight.

Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

moose & elk deadline

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Applications for this fall’s moose and elk hunting seasons must be in the mail and postmarked before midnight March 25.

To apply online, or to print out an application to mail, access the North Dakota Game and Fish Department’s website, gf.nd.gov. Applications are also available at Game and Fish offices, county auditors and license vendors.

Residents age 18 or older are reminded to prove residency on the application by submitting a valid North Dakota driver’s license number or a North Dakota nondriver photo identification number.

Individuals mailing applications to the department are advised to mail early because some post offices use the following day’s postmark for mail received after regular hours. The department’s online application feature will be deactivated March 25 at midnight.

Hunters who have received a license through the lottery in the past are not eligible to apply for that species again.

whooping crane migration

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As snow geese continue to make their way through the state, hunters are advised to properly identify their target as whooping cranes could potentially be in the same areas.

Whooping cranes are also in the midst of their spring migration and sightings will increase as they make their way through North Dakota over the next several weeks. Anyone seeing these birds as they move through the state is asked to report sightings so the birds can be tracked.

Whoopers stand about five feet tall and have a wingspan of about seven feet from tip to tip. They are bright white with black wing tips, which are visible only when the wings are outspread. In flight they extend their long necks straight forward, while their long, slender legs extend out behind the tail. Whooping cranes typically migrate singly, or in groups of 2-3 birds, and may be associated with sandhill cranes.

Other white birds such as snow geese, swans and egrets are often mistaken for whooping cranes. The most common misidentification is pelicans, because their wingspan is similar and they tuck their pouch in flight, leaving a silhouette similar to a crane when viewed from below.

Anyone sighting whoopers should not disturb them, but record the date, time, location, and the birds’ activity. Observers should also look closely for and report colored bands which may occur on one or both legs. Whooping cranes have been marked with colored leg bands to help determine their identity.

Whooping crane sightings should be reported to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office at Lostwood, 701-848-2466, or Long Lake, 701-387-4397, the North Dakota Game and Fish Department in Bismarck,701-328-6300, or to local game wardens across the state. Reports help biologists locate important whooping crane habitat areas, monitor marked birds, determine survival and population numbers, and identify times and migration routes.

positive CWD tests

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Two mule deer taken during the 2014 deer gun season from unit 3F2 in southwestern North Dakota have tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to Dr. Dan Grove, wildlife veterinarian for the State Game and Fish Department.

The total now stands at seven deer to test positive for CWD since 2009, and all were from the same general area within unit 3F2.

“This isn’t surprising, and the number of positives coming out of the area remains low,” Grove said, while mentioning both hunters were notified of the positive results.

In addition to unit 3F2, samples for CWD testing were taken last fall from deer harvested by hunters in the central third of the state, and from any moose or elk taken during the hunting season. In all, more than 1,200 samples were tested.

Since the Game and Fish Department’s sampling efforts began in 2002, more than 25,000 deer, elk and moose have tested negative for CWD.

The hunter-harvested surveillance program annually collects samples taken from hunter-harvested deer in specific regions of the state. In 2015, deer will be tested from the western third of the state.

The Game and Fish Department also has a targeted surveillance program that is an ongoing, year-round effort to test animals found dead or sick.

CWD affects the nervous system of members of the deer family and is always fatal. Scientists have found no evidence that CWD can be transmitted naturally to humans or livestock.

have you seen?

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This week’s North Dakota Game and Fish Department webcast, Outdoors Online, is now online at http://gf.nd.gov. North Dakota Game and Fish aquatic nuisance species coordinator Fred Ryckman talks about ANS in North Dakota waters. Click here to Watch! the video and click here to review a series of FAQs (frequently asked questions) about ANS in North Dakota http://gf.nd.gov/ans/faqs

2015 spring advisory board meetings

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Outdoor enthusiasts are invited to attend a North Dakota Game and Fish Department spring advisory board meeting in their area.

These public meetings, held each spring and fall, provide citizens with an opportunity to discuss fish and wildlife issues and ask questions of their district advisors and agency personnel.

The governor appoints eight Game and Fish Department advisors, each representing a multi-county section of the state, to serve as a liaison between the department and public.

Any person who requires an auxiliary aid or service must notify the contact person at least five days prior to the scheduled meeting date.

 

District 3 – Counties: Benson, Cavalier, Eddy, Ramsey, Rolette and Towner

Date: March 307 p.m.

Location: Chautauqua Room, Lake Region State College, Devils Lake

Host: Lake Region Pheasants Forever

Contact and advisory board member: Tom Rost, Devils Lake, 662-8620

 

District 8 – Counties: Adams, Billings, Bowman, Dunn, Golden Valley, Hettinger, Slope and Stark

Date: March 307 p.m.

Location: St. John Lutheran Church, Dickinson

Host: Boy Scout Troop 32

Contact: Richard Stradling, 483-0019

Advisory board member: Dwight Hecker, Fairfield, 575-4952

 

District 1 – Counties: Divide, McKenzie and Williams

Date: March 317 p.m.

Location: Broadway Commons, Williston

Host: Upper Missouri United Sportsmen

Contact: Wayne Aberle, 770-6902

Advisory board member: Jason Leiseth, Arnegard, 586-3714

 

District 6 – Counties: Barnes, Dickey, Foster, Griggs, Logan, LaMoure, McIntosh, Stutsman and Wells

Date: March 317 p.m.

Location: VFW Club, Valley City

Host: Barnes County Wildlife Federation

Contact: Perry Kapaun, 490-1797

Advisory board member: Joel Christoferson, Litchville, 973-4981

 

District 4 – Counties: Grand Forks, Nelson, Pembina and Walsh

Date: April 67 p.m.

Location: Memorial Union, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks

Host: UND Chapter of Wildlife Society

Contact: Marty Egeland, 739-6982

Advisory board member: Vacant

 

District 5 – Counties: Cass, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Steele and Traill

Date: April 67 p.m.

Location: City Hall, Casselton

Host: Cass County Wildlife Club

Contact: Doug Madsen, 238-3087

Advisory board member: Duane Hanson, West Fargo, 367-4249

 

District 2 – Counties: Bottineau, Burke, McHenry, Mountrail, Pierce, Renville and Ward

Date: April 77 p.m.

Location: Verendrye Electric Cooperative, Velva

Host: Velva Sportsmen’s Club

Contact: Wade Howe, 626-1055

Advisory board member: Robert Gjellstad, Voltaire, 338-2281

 

District 7 – Counties: Burleigh, Emmons, Grant, Kidder, McLean, Mercer, Morton, Oliver, Sheridan and Sioux

Date: April 77 p.m.

Location: Civic Auditorium, Garrison

Host: Garrison Chapter of Pheasants Forever

Contact: Pat Stockdill, 337-5462

Advisory board member: Dave Nehring, Bismarck, 214-3184

April 1 new license needed

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Spring light goose hunters, anglers and trappers are reminded that 2015-16 licenses are required starting April 1.

The 2015-16 small game, fishing and furbearer licenses are effectiveApril 1, 2015 to March 31, 2016.

Licenses can be purchased online by accessing the online services link at the North Dakota Game and Fish Department website, gf.nd.gov.

2014 deer season statistics

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North Dakota deer hunters took approximately 26,300 deer during the 2014 deer gun hunting season.

The State Game and Fish Department made available 48,000 deer gun licenses in 2014, and all licenses were issued. Overall hunter success was 60 percent, with each hunter spending an average of 4.4 days in the field.

Hunter success for antlered white-tailed deer was 60 percent, and antlerless whitetail was 56 percent.

Mule deer buck success was 82 percent. No mule deer doe licenses were issued in 2014.

Hunters with any-antlered or any-antlerless licenses generally harvest white-tailed deer, as these licenses are predominantly in units with mostly whitetails. Buck hunters had a success rate of 65 percent, while doe hunters had a success rate of 63 percent.

A total of 814 muzzleloader hunters harvested 356 white-tailed deer (171 antlered, 185 antlerless). Hunter success was 44 percent, with each hunter spending an average of 5.4 days in the field.

In addition, a record 23,450 archery licenses (21,500 resident, 1,950 nonresident) were issued in 2014. All total, 19,918 bow hunters harvested 6,046 deer (5,593 whitetails, 453 mule deer), for a success rate of 30 percent. Bucks accounted for 78 percent of the harvest. Archers spent an average of 10.7 days afield.

The department is in the process of determining recommendations for licenses in the 2015 deer proclamation. These recommendations will be discussed at the upcoming spring Game and Fish public advisory board meetings, scheduled for March 30-31 and April 6-7. The proclamation will be sent to the governor’s office for approval in late April.

In addition to harvest rates and winter aerial surveys, the department monitors a number of other population indices to determine license numbers, depredation reports, hunter observations, input at advisory board meetings, and comments from the public, landowners and department field staff.

 

state record cisco

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Jack Fletcher’s catch on Feb. 28 broke a state record for cisco that was established nearly 15 years ago.

The Fargo angler reeled in a 2-pound, 9-ounce cisco from Beaver Bay, Lake Oahe, breaking the old record by 1 ounce.

The previous record was held since 2000 by two family members from Pick City, Tylor and Scott Borup Jr., who each reeled in a 2-pound, 8-ounce cisco from the Garrison Dam Tailrace on the same day.