Monthly Archives: September 2007

gramma gator

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77 year old gramma shoots not one…but two gators in a morning. I’m not making this up. Read it here

coming this week: duck season

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The waterfowl opener is coming soon. Here’s a preview with Ducks Unlimited and Scott Stephens from the Grand Forks Herald.

outdoors calendar for the Grand Forks area

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HOOTING


– Today25th annual Black Powder Turkey Shoot, 2 p.m., Olga, N.D.
Muzzleloading rifles with open sights only; rain or shine at the south
edge of town. Proceeds go to preservation of Olga church. Info: Art
Brusseau, (701) 549-3648.

– MondayCoon n’ Crockett Muzzleloaders, 7 p.m., Cabela’s, East Grand Forks. Info: Bill, (701) 594-5356.


– SaturdayMinnesota, Utah and North Dakota Permit to Carry classes, 10
a.m., East Grand Forks Cabela’s; 3 p.m., C’mon Inn., Grand Forks.
Certified instructor Rusty Ramirez will teach, and pre-registration is
necessary. Info: www.permittocarry.org.


– Sept. 23Minnesota and North Dakota Permit to Carry class, noon,
Streiff Sporting Goods near Warroad, Minn. To register: (218) 386-2590.

YOUTH EVENTS


– TodayYouth Sportsman Day, 1 to 5 p.m., Crookston Gun Club.
Activities on tap include archery, target shooting, hunting dog display
and demonstrations, 4-H Shooting Sports info, door prizes, pop and
meal, free Jakes membership to the National Wild Turkey Federation and
more. Limited edition NWTF mountain bike and youth shotgun will be
given away. Open to youths age 6 to 18. Free T-shirt to the first 125
youths who register. Info: Bill Kresl, (218) 281-5805.

BANQUETS


– Sept. 24Marshall County Ducks Unlimited banquet, American Legion,
Warren, Minn. Social at 5:30 p.m., with dinner at 7. Info: Terry
Yanish, (218) 686-6353 or (218) 681-2660.

EVENTS


– Sept. 26Annual duck banding night, 5 p.m., Agassiz National Wildlife
Refuge, Minn. Meet at refuge headquarters and learn about the life
history of several duck species, baiting, capture and handling
techniques, as well as duck sexing and aging. Participants who want to
handle birds should wear old clothing or rain gear, and disposable
gloves and eye protection are required. No pre-registration necessary.
Info: (218) 449-4115 ext. 211 or dial 0 for operator assistance.


– Sept. 29Roseau/Lake of the Woods Recreational Area dedication. ATV
fun run, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., five stops, five different skilled events;
$10 per hand with $5 going to the American Cancer Society. Mud Run 4 to
6 p.m. at Recreational Area, also guided trail rides in Beltrami Island
State Forest. From Roosevelt, Minn., eight miles south on the Krull
Trail, follow the signs; or 8½ miles on the Norris Camp Road and follow
the signs. Info: Myles Hogenson, (218) 689-6889.

– Sept. 29Fall colors walk, 1:30 to 3:15 p.m., Itasca State Park, Minn. Meet outside the Forest Inn.


– Oct. 5Canoe tour, “Paddling the Route of Schoolcraft,” 1 to 4 p.m.,
Itasca State Park, Minn. Meet at the dock on Lake Itasca below Douglas
Lodge.

– Oct. 6Mary Lake fall colors walk, 1:30 to 3:15 p.m., Itasca State Park, Minn. Meet outside the Forest Inn.

– Oct. 7Fall color bike tour, 1:30 to 3 p.m., Itasca State Park, Minn. Meet at Itasca’s Bike and Boat Rental.

N.D. NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE EVENTS


– ThursdayBuild a Bird Feeder Workshop, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Audubon
National Wildlife Refuge near Coleharbor, N.D. Pre-registration
required. Info: (701) 442-5474, ext. 17.

– Oct. 6Go Wild at the Mall, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., West Acres Mall in Fargo. Info: (701) 845-3466.

FISHING

– Saturday-Sept. 23Minnesota Metro Muskie Tournament, Cass Lake Lodge. Info: www.mnmuskietournament.com/metro.html.


– Oct. 5-6North Star Fall Walleye Classic, parts of Lake of the Woods
and Rainy River. Info: Kevin Olmstead, (218) 634-9457 or Wigwam Resort,
(218) 634-2168.

2 songs

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So if ya had two songs to listen to before you went out hunting and when you returned what would they be? Right now it’s Keith Urban, who wouldnt want to be me. and then Rascal Flatts I miss mayberry…i’m not kidding. Those are my two outdoors songs.

got a favorite?

update–definetly can’t do this without Cool Change by LRB-little river band. if EVER there was a song made for summer fishing that IS the one! thanks outdoors gal!

….without a paddle…..

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Edmund Eilbacher and Jeff Petrie had planned to canoe the Mississippi
River in 45 days when they departed May 22 from the headwaters at Lake
Itasca.

I’m not much for canoing. Can’t make it more than a half day. Not to say I don’t enjoy it but when I read this lead, I shook my head in amazement.

Here’s the full story from the GF Herald

PLOTS

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This weeks column takes a look at private land open to sportsmen. With over 1 million acres of public access for walk in hunting we’ve come along way. But don’t think we can supply hunting opportunities for EVERYONE. It’s just a piece of the pie. That’s one thing I worry about—people relying to much on public hunting opportunities. 

5 for the weekend

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My 5 favorite drinks

double shot of Starbucks gold coast roast espresso
vault zero
diet code red mountain dew
green tea
diet pepsi max

what’s your’s

sentenced

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BISMARCK, N.D.

In what officials call a
landmark case in the region, a man has been sentenced to probation and
ordered to repay $20,000 for setting pole traps to illegally kill great
horned owls, red-tail hawks and other protected birds.

The
U.S. attorney’s office says 58-year-old Alvin Schumacher of Valley City
was sentenced Wednesday to 18 months probation. He will lose his
hunting and firearms privileges in North America during that time and
must pay $20,000 in restitution.

Authorities say officers
set up surveillance in a three-year investigation. They say Schumacher
admitted setting pole traps to kill birds he said were preying on his
pen-reared pheasants.

ice fishing..in September? Nick Simonson is nutzo

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Our Outdoor: It’s wrong to think about ice fishing

By Nick Simonson

 

It’s wrong to think about ice fishing right now.  Especially since I reeled in two healthy,
hard-fighting, late summer smallies from under one of my favorite bridges
during lunch today.  More so because I
spent last night attempting to trace the flight patterns of mourning doves over
a cattle pond.  And additionally, the day
before that, I was out searching cut fields for guffawing grouse, which lauged
all the way into the horizon as my shot sprayed over, under and around
them.  We’re in between summer and fall,
a great time to be outdoors enjoying the last few warm days, yet here I am,
thinking about ice fishing and the winter months surrounding it. 

It happens every year about this time, so I don’t know why I
am so surprised. However, I find myself thinking of how fun the upcoming
hardwater season will be.  But I know by
the end of February, I will be absolutely miserable, hunched over my fly tying desk,
thinking that each fly I create will make spring come just a few hours
earlier.  I don’t know why I look forward
to it, knowing how it will end, but I do.

One of the big reasons many anglers, including myself, look
forward to the ice fishing season is due to the gear associated with ice fishing.  I’m not a gear-centered outdoorsman,
preferring simple tools on the water and in the field; but I have my share of
tackle, rods, guns and equipment.  The
most expensive pieces of equipment I own pertain to ice fishing – a portable
shack, a Vexilar, spring bobber rods an auger and more. And just when I think I
have it all, there’s something new. That is why I love getting the first Reed’s
catalog, or the new In-Fisherman Ice Fishing Guide for the upcoming winter. I
spend October and November viewing the new innovations on every page until the
staples fall out and the binding gives way. 
From ice shacks to depthfinders, the latest tweaks on the old and the
brand spankin’ new are on every page.  I
might as well start drawing up my Christmas wish list now. 

As that holiday time of year relates to the region, it is
then that the first layer of fishable ice covers the water of smaller
lakes.  It’s a perfect Christmas present,
maybe more so because it comes a few weeks early.  The first tenuous steps on a frozen water are
an experience only ice anglers and the twelve disciples can relate to.  There is the nervousness of sliding out away
from shore, trusting an unseen force, but there is also the excitement of
incredible rewards.  The first part of
the season is often the best, and missing out on an early ice bite, as I so
often do, is a shame.  It is a time of
big fish, and they look even bigger when magnified through four inches of
clear, fresh ice. 

Then there are the various little things that set the ice
fishing experience apart from any other in the outdoors.  Like when a buddy shows up midday with deer
sausage and a frying pan, and starts up lunch on the propane cooker for
everyone on the ice.  Or when a wolf pack
of pike cruise through the area setting up three or four flags and everyone in
the group takes off in a different direction in an attempt to haul them in on
tip ups.  Or those times, after a new
fallen snow, driving out onto the planar surface of the lake where the
possibility of a successful outing rests, blanketed under a blanket of pre-dawn
stars and sheets of white and the scene is nearly surreal. 

All of these visions and experiences draw the mind to ice
fishing, and despite frigid temperatures waiting around the corner, as sure as
a drop on a slow-climbing roller coaster, I look forward to it with mixed
emotions.  Though I know I shouldn’t be
thinking about it right now, with months of hunting and many weeks of openwater
fishing still available, I still do, and I probably always will be looking
ahead to those adventures on the ice…in our outdoors.

Jamestown Sun outdoors report

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Jamestown Sun

Dakota Recreation Report

Sept. 14, 2007

Patricia Stockdill

Fishing tournaments:

Today & Sat.: Lake Sakakawea, Fort Stevenson State Park.

Saturday: Missouri River, Graner Bottoms.

Fishing:

Southeast District Game Wardens: No reports available.

Coal Mine Lake, Anamoose: Fair for northern pike.

Devils
Lake, C & M Bait, Black Tiger Bay: Anglers starting to see some
bigger walleye. Work 13 to 25 feet. Bait shop closes Sept. 23.

Devils
Lake, Ed’s Bait & Tackle, Devils Lake: Continued fair to good for
small walleye. Try crankbaits on Pelican Lake. Wind limiting angler
numbers.

Devils
Lake, Randy’s Bait Shop, Minnewaukan: Continued fair for walleye. Try
pitching jigs or pulling spinners. Bigger fish starting to show up. Try
6 to 8 feet with jigs with nightcrawlers or minnows or down to 14 feet
with spinners. Northern pike remain scattered throughout using herring
or smelt. White bass scattered. Try shore fishing. Occasional perch.

Devils
Lake, Woodland Resort, Creel Bay: Lots of small walleye with occasional
mixed in. Improving perch bite with several 13-inch fish taken.
Continued white bass success.

Goose Lake, Harvey: Good for northern pike and walleye.

Harvey Dam, Harvey: Fair for northern pike and walleye.

Hoffer Lake, McClusky: fair for pike and walleye.

Jamestown Reservoir, Dan’s Sooper Stop, Jamestown: No reports available.

Jamestown Reservoir, Pioneer Bait Shop, Jamestown: Cool activity limiting angler numbers.

Lake
Ashtabula, Bay Shore Resort, Valley City: Continued good perch and bass
success with improving walleye activity. Not big numbers of walleye but
a better percentage of keepers.

Lake
Sakakawea, Cenex Bait & Tackle, Garrison: Spotty walleye activity
on east end of Lake Sakakawea. Work 20 to 50 feet using crankbaits or
Lindy rigs and bottom bouncers. Look for improving success with cooler
weather.

Lake
Sakakawea, Indian Hills Resort, Garrison: Still somewhat slow to fair
walleye success but try 20 to 25 feet using crankbaits.

Lake
Sakakawea, Scott’s Bait & Tackle, Pick City: Lake Sakakawea has
improving walleye activity. Try north shore or first 3 bays out of Pick
City in 30 feet using slow presentation with Lindy rigs and
nightcrawlers. Some salmon success. Try longlining along dam in the
morning in 30 feet along the rocks. Work 50 to 65 feet during the day
with downriggers. Look for more salmon closer to shore when water
temperatures turn cooler. Occasional salmon from shore. A few northern
pike from shore while salmon fishing. Missouri River has low flows but
tailrace has catfish bite. Not much salmon and trout activity in
chutes. Walleye poor to fair down river. Look for salmon to start
moving with cooler water temperatures in the river.

Missouri
River, Dakota Tackle, Bismarck: Work farther south on Missouri River or
north around Stanton, depending on water releases.

Pipestem Reservoir, Dan’s Sooper Stop, Jamestown: No reports available.

Pipestem
Reservoir, Pioneer Bait Shop, Jamestown: Weather slowing angling
activity but prior to that, anglers were finding fair success.

Spiritwood Lake, Dan’s Sooper Stop, Jamestown: No reports available.

Spiritwood Lake, Pioneer Bait Shop, Jamestown: Not many reports with few anglers on the water.

Hunting:

N.D.
Game & Fish Dept. District Game Wardens: Fair grouse success in
Eddy and Foster counties and surrounding area with lots of birds and
cover. Not many grouse hunters out for the opener in the east-central
and southern part of the state, but those going found fair to good
numbers.

Lonetree
Wildlife Mgmt. Area: Poor grouse opener with wet conditions. Dove
numbers remain good but could change with cooler weather. Fair for deer
bow hunting.

Northeast North Dakota: Good duck numbers but only fair local Canada goose numbers around for the Sept. 22 opener.

Southeast N.D.: Hunters finding fair grouse numbers.

Numbers to know:

N.D. Game & Fish Department, main Bismarck office: 328-6300. Web site: (http://gf.nd.gov).

N.D. Game & Fish Department, Jamestown office: 253-6480.

Rare Bird Alert: 355-8554.

Report All Poachers: (800) 472-2121.